“Information sharing and data innovation is at the heart of public sector reforms.” Professor Miriam Lips

Locality Solutions & CVUHB – Working together to create Safer Communities.

With the Well-being of Future Generations Act playing a central role on how best to improve citizen outcomes, public services are finding better ways on information sharing for a more joined-up approach in delivering a holistic service.

Our recent project with the Cardiff & Vale Health board has been a great example of how public services have identified that collaboration is key to ensure prevention and reduction of frequent attenders to the A&E.

It’s been 2 months into our project with CVUHB and the A&E Department, Heath Hospital  Cardiff, and we’ve learnt a great deal about the challenges public services and partner agencies face when working together.

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Rachel Williams, an ambassador for Welsh and Llanelli Women’s Aid, has joined the #TroubleWithAnEx campaign to educate potential victims and their families about how to identify stalking behaviour and how to get suitable help.

Run by the Network for Surviving Stalking charity and joined by Gwent Police, Rachel Williams has become an advocate for #TroubleWithAnEx, with an aim of increasing the knowledge and recognition of signs of an abusive relationship.

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Hate crimes in England and Wales have risen by 18%, according to new Home Office figures, with police recording 52,528 hate crimes in 2014/15 – up from 44,471 the previous year.

During National Hate Crime Awareness Week, we were delighted to showcase our work with the community safety team at RCT Homes in tackling hate crime and anti-social behaviour across the authority.

 

Community Safety Team Download the full release

 

Smart technology from a rising firm is helping a community safety team tackle hate crime and anti-social behaviour in Rhondda Cynon Taff as a national awareness campaign gets underway.

 

With National Hate Crime Awareness Week highlighting the issues around hate crime and how people can respond, RCT Homes is celebrating a ‘major transformation’ in results thanks to innovative software from Cardiff-based Locality Solutions.

 

Hate crimes in England and Wales have risen by 18%, according to new Home Office figures, with police recording 52,528 hate crimes in 2014/15 – up from 44,471 the previous year.

 

When RCT Homes – Wales’ largest registered social landlord – needed greater support for tenants experiencing hate crime, anti-social behaviour and domestic abuse, it turned to Locality, specialists in using technology to improve results for the people who use community services.

 

With Locality’s intuitive and mobile system, neighbourhood managers and community safety staff now receive alerts about tenants who are vulnerable to hate crime and anti-social behaviour and, as a result, can respond more quickly to incidents.

 

Following RCT Homes’ success, Locality Solutions is already working with further organisations and agency partners in Rhondda Cynon Taff to create stronger, more desirable neighbourhoods. And the firm has chosen National Hate Crime Awareness Week to show how its software can benefit local communities, in the hope of inspiring more housing associations to think in new ways. Locality Solutions’ managing director Adrian Leen said:

 

“Since community teams at RCT Homes started using our innovative software, the organisation has reported a major transformation in terms of increased quality and customer satisfaction. They are now looking into adopting the technology elsewhere within the business, and already we are working with further partners who plan to adopt our system.

In Hate Crime Awareness Week, our aim is to show that real change can be made within communities with a little forward thinking and the right technology. We now hope to create a culture of collaboration that will also benefit other housing associations and partner agencies.”

 

Founded in 2011, Locality Solutions has quickly established a reputation as the go-to provider for cloud based solutions in areas such as case management, service management and property management. With directors Adrian Leen and Karen Boparoy at the helm, the expanding team recently secured a £250,000 private investment and moved into a new workspace in Cardiff’s vibrant Creative Quarter, setting out its intention to develop a global brand.

 

 

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Additional Information

For more information or further images, please call Rebecca Lees on 07950 060613 or email rebecca@rebeccalees.co.uk

 

Additionally, have a look at our full case study of the RCT Homes ASB Case Management Solution.

Do you think we can help you? We’d love to hear from you, just get in touch.

From 10th until the 17th October, it’s Hate Crime Awareness Week. But what is a Hate Crime really?

They are defined as any crimes targeted at a person because of hostility or prejudice towards that person’s:

  • race or ethnicity
  • religion
  • sexual orientation
  • transgender identity
  • disability

 

A victim does not have to be a member of the group at which the hostility is targeted. In fact, anyone could be a victim of a hate crime. A main focus of this years campaign is addressing the under reporting and this can happen due to a number of reasons – lack of confidence in the system, a lack of understanding that a crime has been committed, right through to the fear of reprisal.

At Locality we’ll be supporting National Hate Crime Awareness Week, showcasing some of our work in partnership with key agencies to uphold community safety and in developing solutions for anti-social behaviour.

 

Additional Information

In order to learn more, there are a number of useful websites you can visit.

 

Stop Hate UK

Report-it.org.uk

 

Also, You can always follow the conversation on social media using the hashtag #HCAW15

The Welsh Government with Tai Pawb have released guidance on dealing with hate crime for social landlords.

You can find it here. Alicja Zalesinska, director of Tai Pawb, has been urging housing organisations to look at the issues from the victims’ perspective. This may be a cultural shift in many organisations as they start looking at their policies and processes.


The guidelines go over priorities and good practice examples along with advice for Social landlords. The update focuses on prevention, increasing reporting, support & enforcement, multi-agency working, monitoring & evaluation.

The findings of the 2013/14 CPS Violence against Women and Girls Crime Report were released ahead of a speech by Ms Saunders today at the Women’s Aid national conference in Birmingham. She said: “Three quarters of people who are prosecuted for domestic violence offences are now convicted. What’s more, nine in ten of the domestic violence convictions arise from guilty pleas meaning that the vast majority of victims are spared having to give evidence in court. “I hope victims of these terrible offences will take some confidence from this, and that perpetrators will take note.

 

“I am incredibly proud of what the CPS has achieved in recent years in tackling violence against women and girls. Taken as a whole, referrals from police are up, prosecutions are up, and convictions are up.” According to Sandra Horley, Chief Exec of domestic vioelence charity Refuge said the CPS has made ‘much-needed progress’ under Ms Saunder’s leadership. Crime prevention minister Norman Baker said: “I hope that the increase in the conviction rate for domestic violence will give victims of these terrible crimes greater confidence to come forward.” Nearly £40 million will be set aside for specialist local support services and national helplines for victim support along with the national roll-out of Clare’s Law, the domestic violence disclosure scheme to try and protect victims. Norman Baker also noted that there was an oversight group looking to implement He noted Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary’s (HMIC) recommendations on improving the police response to domestic abuse. The report reveals:

  • The volume of convictions for sexual offences excluding rape reached the highest ever volume at 6,756, a rise of 13% from the year before.
  • The volume of child abuse prosecutions reached 7,998 – a rise of 440 (5.8%) since 2012-13. /li>
  • The volume of convictions in the overall child abuse cases from 5,755 in 2012-13 to 6,096 in 2013-14 (from 76.1% convicted in 2012-13 to 76.2% in 2013-14).
  • The volume of forced marriage referrals from the police rose to 67 in 2013-14 – from 59 in 2012-13. A total of 42 (62.7%) of these were charged, the highest number on record.
  • The volume of referrals from the police of honour based violence and related offences rose to 240 in 2013-14 – from 230 in 2012-13. One hundred and fifty eight (65.8%) of these referrals were charged, the highest volume and proportion recorded.
  • In 2013-14 there was a rise in the prosecution of child abuse images from 18,937 to 20,373.
  • The volume of human trafficking referrals from the police rose to 171 in 2013-14 – a rise of 30.5% from 131 referrals in 2012-13.

Read the Report here.

This quarterly release presents the most recent crime statistics from two different sources: the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) (previously known as the British Crime Survey), and police recorded crime. It also draws on data from other sources to provide a more comprehensive picture of crime and disorder, including incidents of anti-social behaviour recorded by the police and other transgressions of the law that are dealt with by the courts but are not covered in the recorded crime collection.

 

Key points presented by the National Statistics Office include:

  • Latest figures from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) estimate that there were 8.5 million crimes experienced by households and resident adults in the previous 12 months, based on interviews with a nationally representative sample in the year ending June 2013. In addition, the CSEW also estimated that there were 0.8 million crimes experienced by children aged 10 to 15 resident in the household population.
  • The headline estimate for crimes against households and resident adults was down 7% compared with the previous year’s survey. This is the lowest over the history of the survey, which began in 1981, and is now less than half its peak level in 1995.
  • The police recorded 3.7 million offences in the year ending June 2013, a decrease of 5% compared with the previous year. This is the lowest comparative level since 2002/03 when the National Crime Recording Standard was introduced to bring greater consistency to crime recording.
  • Victim-based crime accounted for 83% of all police recorded crime (3.1 million offences) and fell by 6% in the year ending June 2013 compared with the previous year.
  • Other crimes against society recorded by the police (400,156) showed a decrease of 8% compared with the previous year.
  • In the year ending June 2013, 230,335 fraud offences were recorded. This represents a volume increase of 21% compared with the previous year and should be seen in the context of a move towards the centralised recording of fraud by the police.
  • Within victim-based crime, there were decreases across all the main categories of recorded crime compared with the previous year, except for theft from the person (up 8%), shoplifting (up 1%) and sexual offences (up 9%). The latter increase is thought to be partly a ‘Yewtree effect’, whereby greater numbers of victims have come forward to report historical sexual offences to the police.
  • There were an additional 1.0 million offences dealt with by the courts in the year ending March 2013 (the latest period for which data are available), which are not included in the police recorded crime figures. These cover less serious crimes, such as speeding offences, which are dealt with no higher than magistrates courts.

Download the Report here -> http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171778_360216.pdf

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